« Spring love | Main | Dreaming of spring! »
Wednesday
Apr242013

Crumb Coffee Cake

This picture is nothing special. In fact it is quite unattractive. We hosted an Easter weekend brunch and I wanted to make a coffee cake. No time for pictures before the brunch and then the work week started and I was on my regular race through it - that left plenty of time to eat this delicious cake but no time to properly photograph it. But in the last ditch effort to capture this amazing coffee cake, I threw the last piece on a plate and took this picture. 

I have a love affair with coffee cakes. They speak to me of a time when there was time. When people sat down for coffee and cake and took a moment to connect with themselves or someone special. I think that in my ideal world there would always be a coffee cake on hand for when a neighbor or friend stops in to chat. 

I adore funnel pans and bundt pans. Big cakes that cut unto hefty wedges of butter, cinnamon, fruit and glaze. Great on their own and even better with a cup of coffee. I have been eying the New York Crumb Cake recipe in the Baked Explorations recipe book. If you don't know about the gentlemen from Baked let me introduce you. "Matt and Renato really, really like dessert. Perhaps, a little too much." With a love a baking and bakeries on the side of their regular day jobs they eventually were able to open Baked in NYC. They still run this bakery as well as continue to write beautiful cookbooks. To say I have a crush would be putting it mildly. They are to me, the Justin Bieber of the baking world and I am a great fan. 

Crumb Coffee cake baking has eluded me until now. I have eaten my fair share and appreciate the ratio of crumb to cake. Far more crumb than cake. This is what makes a NY crumb cake different. My good friend Jessie of CakeSpy and an East Coast native loves some crumb cake. If possible the more crumb the better. She had been on my mind lately and that was part of my decision to tackle this cake. 

An easy recipe to follow as all the Baked recipes are. Be warned - I do know that some of my crumb topping never made it to the cake. It was irresistible. I don't like to talk out loud about how much butter went into it either. 


New York Crumb Cake
recipe from Baked Explorations by Matt Lewis & Renalto Poliafito


Crumb Topping
1 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 tablespoons cinnamon
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted (and still warm)
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Cake
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 1/4 cups sour cream, at room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  Spray a 9x13 baking pan with cooking spray.  

To make the crumb topping: Whisk the flour, brown sugar, granulated sugar, salt and cinnamon together in a large bowl.  Add the melted butter and whisk to combine.  Use a rubber spatula to fold in the flour.

To make the cake: In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar together on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2-3 minutes.  Beat in the eggs, one at a time, letting the first incorporate fully before adding the second.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl and beat for an additional 30 seconds.  Add the sour cream and vanilla to the mixer and beat until just incorporated.  Finally, add the flour mixture in thirds, beating just until combined.

Transfer the batter to the prepared baking pan.  The batter will be thick, use a spatula to spread it evenly.  Pick up the crumb topping by handfuls, and break off chunks, scattering them over the top of the batter.  Use all of the topping.

Bake for 45-55 minutes (rotating the pan at 15 minute intervals), or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.  Let the cake cool in the pan for at least 30 minutes before serving. 

References (7)

References allow you to track sources for this article, as well as articles that were written in response to this article.

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>